• Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

The reports and comments on this site are currently written by Keith Goode.

ERA’s reports mainly cover precious and base metals companies where anyone can see what the price of the product is, with the majority being gold companies, followed by nickel companies.

The reports are paid for by the company concerned and email distributed free. However, we only do them if we like the management (70%), project (20%) and country (10%) for which you need about 90% in each category.

Sites are visited in order to write a report, and typically a week is spent with a company and then it is written up in the following 2 to 3 weeks, with excel modeling where required slowing the report's timing. Report sizes are typically 6 to 12 pages.

Apr 2011 - The Key to Edna May

“New” Techniques Unravel the Key to Edna May

Catalpa’s initial asset was the old Edna May mine and surrounding tenements along the Westonia Greenstone Belt, on the northern outskirts of the town of Westonia, about halfway between Perth and Kalgoorlie (or ~310km east of Perth).

Feb 2011 - The Fuzzy Clock

The Clock's Fuzzy!

The latest update on the lion “clock” by the Lion Selection group release on the 28 February 2011, has it about half-way through a possibly shorter cycle this time. The clock used to work quite well – at least for two 10-year cycles to 1997 and 2008, but appears to have become ”Fuzzy” as illustrated by the numerous IPOs and exploration occurring before, during and after the mergers, not after as shown in Figure 1.

Jan 2011 - China Stopping?

China is Not Going to Stop...

We have said it before and are repeating it here again, namely China is not going to stop. We made our annual visit to the China Mining Conference that was held last year (in November 2010) in Tainjin. We have visited the conference every year since 2004, and seen them gradually evolve to hosting over 3000 delegates.

Apr 2010 - 5g/t Rule of Thumb

Is it Time to Reduce the
“5g
/t Rule of Thumb” ?

Underground mining has a number of “rules of thumb”, one of which that has stood the test of time, is that for most mines you need 5g/t in order to mine underground. And if it is refractory add 20% so it becomes 6g/t.

At 5g/t it meant that the mine should be able to achieve a capital return and return the invested money back, allowing for the odd occasional thing to go wrong – or in other words provide a reasonable margin for error.